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Massive Egg Recall Following Salmonella Outbreak

Aug 18, 2010 | Parker Waichman LLP

Consumers across the country are being warned to check their kitchens for recalled eggs, after more than 200 people contracted Salmonella from tainted eggs.   The outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis has sickened people in California, Colorado and Minnesota.  According to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), health officials in other states - Arizona, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, Nevada, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas - are ialso investigating illnesses.

Salmonella Enteritidis is the most common type of salmonella poisoning. It can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections, endocarditis or arthritis.

The recalled eggs were distributed by Wright County Egg, in Galt, Iowa, and are packaged under the following brand names: Lucerne, Albertson, Mountain Dairy, Ralph’s, Boomsma’s, Sunshine, Hillandale, Trafficanda, Farm Fresh, Shoreland, Lund, Dutch Farms and Kemps. According to an Associated Press report, the recall involves 228 million eggs.

The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) says consumers shouldn’t eat the eggs and they should return them to the store where they were purchased. The recalled eggs were packed in cartons of various sizes, including 6-egg cartons, dozen-egg cartons and 18-egg cartons, and feature Julian dates ranging from 136 to 225 and plant numbers 1026, 1413 and 1946. Dates and codes can be found stamped on the end of the egg carton. The plant number begins with the letter P and then the number. The date follows the plant number. For example: P-1946 223.

The eggs were distributed to food wholesalers, distribution centers and foodservice companies in California, Illinois, Missouri, Colorado, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. However, all of these companies distribute nationwide.

According to the CDC, there has been a four-fold increase in the number of Salmonella Enteritidis infections reported to PulseNet, the national subtyping network made up of state and local public health laboratories and federal food regulatory laboratories. Other states have also reported increases since May 2010.

Preliminary information from investigations of outbreaks in California, Colorado, and Minnesota revealed several restaurants or events where more than one person ill with this type of Salmonella had eaten. Information suggests that shell eggs are the likely source of infections in many of these restaurants or events, the CDC said.


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