Yourlawyer.com (News Corp 9/11 Terrorist Attack Victims Hacking Scandal News) http://www.yourlawyer.com/topics/overview/news-corp-world-trade-center-9-11-victim-hacking-scandal Wed, 16 Apr 2014 12:14:33 -0400 Wed, 16 Apr 2014 12:14:33 -0400 pixel-app en FBI News Corp. Hacking Probe Now Underway http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/fbi-news-corp-hacking-probe-now-underway Wed, 20 Jul 2011 00:00:00 -0400 http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/fbi-news-corp-hacking-probe-now-underway The FBI has officially opened its investigation into possible hacking of 9/11 terrorist attack victims by the U.K. tabloid, News of the World, an entity of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. media conglomerate.  According to a report from The Wall Street Journal, the FBI has contacted both the New York police and its own victims' assistance office as part of the probe.

A spokesperson for the New York Police Department (NYPD) confirmed to the Journal that the FBI had made contact, but that the department had nothing substantial to report.  The NYPD has not received any complaints from 9/11 victims relatives in regards to hacking, he said.

A person familiar with the case also told the Journal that the FBI's Office for Victim Assistance has not received any such complaints.

The Journal also reported that FBI investigators plan to formally meet with U.K. authorities for briefing on what evidence, if any, they have gathered about alleged violations in the U.S.

Reporters for the 168-year-old News of the World tabloid  are known to have hacked thousands of phones, including those belonging to a teenage murder victim, British Prime Minister David Cameron, and scores of celebrities.   Recently, the U.K. Daily Mail reported that an unnamed, retired NYPD officer alleged that reporters for the tabloid contacted him about 9/11 victims' phone information.   "[The investigator's] presumption was that they wanted the information so they could hack into the relevant voicemails, just like it has been shown they have done in the U.K.," a Mirror source said.

Yesterday while testifying before a committee of the British Parliament, News Corp.'s founder, 80-year-old Rupert Murdoch, asserted that he and other company executives have no knowledge or any evidence of any hacking of Sept. 11 victims' phones or voice mails by reporters.

"I cannot believe it happened anywhere in America," he told the House of Commons' Culture, Media, and Sport Committee, according to the Journal.

According to The Wall Street Journal, though the FBI's News Corp. probe is only in its preliminary stages, it is already known that it will go beyond the hacking allegations. The FBI is also trying to determine if alleged bribes paid to British police officials could constitute a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which makes such bribes a crime in the U.S.

Meanwhile, shareholders are expressing their anger over the entire News Corp. debacle.  In a filing in a Delaware court, a group of investors charge the hacking allegations show “a culture run amok within News Corp.” The charges were added to a News Corp. shareholder lawsuit filed in Delaware Chancery Court several months ago, which was amended to include the hacking scandal






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Rupert Murdoch and Son to Appear at Parliament, as Fallout from Phone Hacking Sandal Grows http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/rupert-murdoch-and-son-to-appear-at-parliament-as-fallout-from-phone-hacking-sandal-grows-1 Tue, 19 Jul 2011 00:00:00 -0400 http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/rupert-murdoch-and-son-to-appear-at-parliament-as-fallout-from-phone-hacking-sandal-grows-1 Rupert Murdoch, the 80-year-old owner of News Corp., is set to answer questions about the News of the World hacking scandal today before a committee of the British Parliament.  He will be joined by his son, James, who serves as News Corp. chairman and CEO. 

According to a report from MSNBC, the stakes are high for both Rupert and James Murdoch, and for News Corp.  In the two weeks since the hacking scandal broke, the company's stock has dropped 21 percent, an $8 billion loss.  The loss is said to have cost the Murdoch family $1 billion.  The scandal has also forced News Corp. to drop plans to take full control of U.K. pay TV operator BSkyB.

Millions in Britain are expected to tune in to watch the Murdochs' testimony, MSNBC said.

"It seems as if there will be standing-room only, that's not surprising as it's the first time Rupert Murdoch has been before a select committee in his 40 years of building up a media empire," said Paul Farrelly, an opposition Labour committee member.

Reporters for the 168-year-old News of the World tabloid  are known to have hacked thousands of phones, including those belonging to a teenage murder victim, British Prime Minister David Cameron, and scores of celebrities.  It has also been alleged that News of the World may have hacked into phones belonging to victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. 

Initially, the media conglomerate's official answer to the charges was to insist the hacking was the work of "rogue reporters" at News of the World.   But revelations over the past week made it clear that wasn't the case.  Public outrage in Britain hit fever-pitch when it was learned that reporters for the tabloid had hacked voicemail belonging to a missing teenager who was later found to be murdered.  The reporters ultimately deleted messages and raised false hopes she could be still alive, MSNBC said.

Also testifying today is Rebekah Brooks, a former Murdoch protégée and head of the News of the World when hacking was taking place.  Brooks, who resigned her position as News International CEO last week, was arrested yesterday for her role in the hacking.  She is one of ten News of the World employees facing charges, though more arrests could follow.

Meanwhile, News Corp. is facing more trouble in the U.S., as MSNBC is reporting that the Justice Department it was investigating $160,000 in payments the company made to officials at the U.K.'s Scotland Yard to see if they violated the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which makes bribing an official in another country a crime.  U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder already confirmed that the Justice Department was looking into the 9/11 hacking allegations.

In a filing in a Delaware court, a group of investors charge the hacking allegations show “a culture run amok within News Corp.” The charges were added to a shareholder suit filed in Delaware Chancery Court several months ago, which was amended to include the hacking scandal.

Finally, one of the first News of the World Reporters to come forward in the scandal has died.  According to the Guardian, Sean Hoare told The NewYork Times in 2010 that the tabloid’s editor, Andy Coulson, had actively encouraged him to hack into voicemail.  Hoare was found dead in his London home yesterday, and investigators are calling his death "unexplained" but not suspicious.  According to a report from the Daily Mail, Hoare had become reclusive and paranoid in recent weeks due to stress caused by the scandal.

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FBI Investigating News Corp. 9/11 Victim Hacking Allegations http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/fbi-investigating-news-corp-911-victim-hacking-allegations-1 Fri, 15 Jul 2011 00:00:00 -0400 http://www.yourlawyer.com/articles/title/fbi-investigating-news-corp-911-victim-hacking-allegations-1 The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has opened an investigation into allegations that a News Corp.-owned tabloid newspaper may have hacked into phones belonging to victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  News Corp., founded by billionaire Rupert Murdoch, owns a number of media outlets including Fox News and The Wall Street Journal. 

The tabloid at the center of the allegations is the News of the World, a 168-year-old U.K. tabloid that was forced to shut down amid a massive phone hacking scandal.  According to a report from CNET.com, earlier this month, reporters from News of the World were accused of hacking the voicemail of a teenaged murder victim, 13-year-old Milly Dowler, who went missing in March 2002.  According to a report from the Guardian, the News of the World accessed her cell phone voice mail and actually deleted messages that had been left in the first few days after her disappearance in order to free up space in her phone's mailbox.  This gave the victim's family and friends false hope, as they believed she was the one clearing the messages.  Sadly, Dowler's body was discovered in September 2002.

As the U.K. investigation of News of the World continued, it was alleged that the publication also hacked voice mails of other families of child victims, soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq, and victims of the 2005 London bombings, CNET.com said.

The scandal reached U.S. shores earlier this week, when the U.K.'s Daily Mirror reported that a former New York City police officer who now works as a private investigator charged that reporters wanted the 9/11 victims' phone numbers and details of their call logs in the time leading up to the attack on the Twin Towers. "[The investigator's] presumption was that they wanted the information so they could hack into the ¬relevant voicemails, just like it has been shown they have done in the U.K.," a Mirror source said.  The report also alleged that some of that hacking may have occurred on U.S. soil.

Those allegations quickly prompted calls for investigations from several prominent U.S. lawmakers and victims' families. Rep. Peter King (R., N.Y.), who heads the House Homeland Security Committee and represents a Long Island district were many 9/11 attack victims lived, called on the FBI to look into the charges.

Yesterday, various media sources reported that FBI had opened a probe into the hacking allegations.  In addition, the probe will also look into whether any News Corp. employees bribed or sought to bribe police officials to gain access to such records, according to a report from The Wall Street Journal.  The FBI, which doesn't confirm investigations, would not comment on the reports.

In an interview with the Journal, the 80-year-old Rupert Murdoch dismissed the damage the scandal has caused to News Corp. as "nothing that will not be recovered. We have a reputation of great good works in this country." He conceded, however, that he was "getting annoyed. ...I'll get over it. I'm tired."

Murdoch also said he and one of his sons would appear at a parliamentary hearing in the U.K. next week to answer question about the scandal, after refusing to do so.  Apparently,  Murdoch had a change of heart when they learned he would be summoned by Parliament.

Meanwhile, Rebekah Brooks, the head of News Corp.'s U.K. newspaper unit resigned Friday morning because of the scandal, the Journal said.  The 43-year-old Brooks was editor of News of the World when that Milly Dowler incident occurred.  Brooks had offered to resign earlier, as pressure over the scandal mounted, but the offer was rejected. 

"I feel a deep sense of responsibility for the people we have hurt and I want to reiterate how sorry I am," Brooks said in an email to staff, according to the Journal. "I have believed that the right and responsible action has been to lead us through the heat of the crisis, however my desire to remain on the bridge has made me a focal point of the debate.

Brooks is scheduled to testify next week before Parliament, alongside both Murdochs.
 

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News Corp 9/11 Terrorist Attack Victims, Voicemail Hacking Scandal | Illegal Voicemail Access, Allegations, Investigations | Personal Injury, Parker Waichman LLP http://www.yourlawyer.com/topics/overview/news-corp-world-trade-center-9-11-victim-hacking-scandal Fri, 15 Jul 2011 00:00:00 -0400 http://www.yourlawyer.com/topics/overview/news-corp-world-trade-center-9-11-victim-hacking-scandal News Corp. 9/11 Terrorist Attack Victim Phone, Voicemail Hacking Scandal

News Corp., News of the World Tabloid, Media Companies founded by Rupert Murdoch | 9/11 Terrorist Victims Illegal Voicemail Access, Illegal hacking of phones of victims of September 11 attacks, Cell Phone Hacking | Lawsuit Lawyer

The media conglomerate, News Corp., founded by Rupert Murdoch that owns, among other things, the Fox News network, The Wall Street Journal, and the New York Post, is embroiled in a phone hacking scandal that may include victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Parker Waichman LLP is currently investigating these allegations, and our personal injury attorneys intend to hold News Corp. accountable if it is determined that any of its media companies illegally accessed voicemail or other private property belonging to 9/11 victims.

If you are a family member of a 9/11 victim who cell phones or voicemail may have been targeted and hacked by News Corp., you can fight back. To find out how our lawyers can help you hold News Corp., News of the World and Rupert Murdoch's other media entities accountable in a potential phone hacking scandal lawsuit for this despicable form of tabloid journalism, we urge you to contact us today.

As reported in CNN recently, the News Corp. phone hacking scandal continues to grow, with the arrest over the weekend of a former Rupert Murdoch protégée, Rebekah Brooks. The scandal has also claimed the careers of the London police commissioner and the top cop at the U.K.'s Scotland Yard. Brooks was the head of News of the World when the alleged phone hacking took place. She was arrested on suspicion of corruption and conspiring to intercept communications in relation to the hacking debacle on Saturday, after turning herself in at a London police station. She had resigned her current position as CEO of News International, which publishes News Corp.'s U.K. titles, the day prior.

Over the weekend, Britain’s top police official, Sir Paul Stephenson, left amid allegations he employed expensive News Corp. operatives to advise Scotland Yard. London police commissioner John Yates, who was in charge of a 2006 investigation into illegal telephone intercepts by News of the World, resigned the same day. According to the Associated Press, the Independent Police Complaints Commission, a British police watchdog, says it has received allegations of potential wrongdoing in connection with phone hacking against Stephenson, Yates and two other former high-ranking police officers. Among them, that Yates inappropriately helped get a job for the daughter of former News of the World editor, Neil Wallis, one of 10 people arrested in the scandal.

Meanwhile, journalist Sean Hoare, one of the first to blow the whistle on the News of the World hacking scandal, was found dead today at his home outside of London. According to the British Press Association, Hoare's death is being treated as “unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious.”

The News Corp. illegal phonea hacking scandal has already resulted in the demise of one of the company's U.K. tabloids, News of the World. Reporters for the 168-year-old tabloid are known to have hacked thousands of phones, including those belonging to a teenage murder victim and British Prime Minister David Cameron.

U.K. media outlets are also reporting that News of the World may have hacked into phones belonging to victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Some of that phone hacking may have occurred on U.S. soil. According to the U.K.'s Daily Mirror, a former New York City police officer who now works as a private investigator has charged that reporters wanted the victims' phone numbers and details of their call logs in the time leading up to the attack on the Twin Towers. "[The investigator's] presumption was that they wanted the information so they could hack into the ¬relevant voicemails, just like it has been shown they have done in the U.K.," a Mirror source said.

Families of 9/11 terrorist attack victims are now demanding that U.S. authorities investigate these allegations into phone hacking scandal. In the U.S., where allegations that News of the World may have hacked or tried to hack phones belonging to victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Attorney General Eric Holder has confirmed the Department of Justice is investigating News Corp.

"There have been members of Congress in the United States who have asked us to investigate those same allegations and we are progressing in that regard using the appropriate Federal law enforcement agencies," Holder told reporters during a trip to Australia.

The 9/11 victim hacking accusations have also sparked calls for investigations by several members of Congress, including senators Jay Rockefeller (D - W. Va), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), Bob Menendez (D-NJ) and Barbara Boxer (D-CA), as well as New York Rep. Peter King (R).

News Corp. Cell Phone Hacking Victims Legal Help

The thought that reporters were attempting to gain access to the private information of 9/11 victims via hacking is truly sickening. If these allegations turn out to be accurate, it is vital that News Corp. be held accountable.

If your loved one perished in the 9/11 attacks, and you believe a News Corp.-owned media outlet was attempting to hack their voicemails, you have valuable legal rights. To learn how the lawyers at our firm can help you obtain justice in the name of your loved one, please fill out our online form or call 1-800-YOURLAWYER (1-800-968-7529) today to discuss how Parker Waichman LLP can help establish a phone hacking scandal lawsuit against News Corp and the British tabloid, News of the World.


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