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Cell Phone Texting Accident Injuries

Distracted Driving: Cell Phones Fuel a Dangerous Trend

Distracted Driving: Cell Phones Fuel a Dangerous Trend

Distracted Driving: Cell Phones Fuel a Dangerous Trend


So-called “distracted driving” is a leading cause of serious car accidents, and the growing use of cell phones and text messaging has only added to the danger. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), at any given moment during the daylight hours, over 660,000 vehicles are being driven by someone using a hand-held cell phone or other electronic device. Available research indicates that cell phone use while driving, whether a hands-free or hand-held device is in use, degrades a driver’s performance, according to the agency.


Consider these statistics from the NHTSA:

  • The leading source of driver inattention is use of a cell phone or other wireless device.
  • Ten percent of fatal crashes in 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, were reported to be distraction-affected crashes.
  • Seventeen percent of injury crashes in 2011 were reported to be distraction-affected crashes.
  • In 2011, more than 3,300 people died and 387,000 were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver, according to the NHTSA.
  • Of those injured in distraction-affected crashes, an estimated 21,000 were injured in crashes that involved the use of cell phones at the time of the crashes (5% of injured people in distraction-affected crashes).
  • Eleven percent of all drivers 15-19 years old involved in fatal crashes were reported as being distracted at the time of the crashes. This age group has the largest proportion of distracted drivers.
Cell Phone Texting Accident

Other studies have found that talking on a cell phone or texting can severely impair the ability to drive. For instances, researchers at the University of Utah have determined that cell phone use while driving (hand held or hands free) extends a driver's reaction as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. Another study, from Carnegie Mellon University, found that driving while using a cell phone reduces the amount of brain activity associated with driving by 37 percent.

Other studies have found that talking on a cell phone or texting can severely impair the ability to drive. For instances, researchers at the University of Utah have determined that cell phone use while driving (hand held or hands free) extends a driver's reaction as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. Another study, from Carnegie Mellon University, found that driving while using a cell phone reduces the amount of brain activity associated with driving by 37 percent.

Teens and Cell Phones

Teenagers are probably the most enthusiastic users of cell phones and texting. In fact, an April 2010 study from the Pew Research Foundation found that fully 72 percent of all teens — or 88 percent of teen cell phone users — are text-messagers – up from the 51 percent of teens who were texters in 2006. More than half of teens (54 percent) are daily texters, the Pew study found. Among all teens, their frequency of use of texting has now overtaken the frequency of every other common form of interaction with their friends.

Most disturbingly, 34 percent of teens aged 16-17 admitted to texting while driving. According to the Pew study, that translates into 26 percent of all American teens ages 16-17.

Other findings from the Pew study included:

  • Half (52 percent) of cell-owning teens ages 16-17 say they have talked on a cell phone while driving. That translates into 43 percent of all American teens ages 16-17.
  • 48 percent of all teens ages 12-17 say they have been in a car when the driver was texting.
  • 40 percent say they have been in a car when the driver used a cell phone in a way that put themselves or others in danger.

Boys and girls are equally likely to report texting behind the wheel as well as riding with texting drivers. As teens get older, they are more likely to report riding with drivers who text, the Pew study found.

Need Legal Help Regarding Cell Phone Texting Accidents ?

The personal injury attorneys at Parker Waichman LLP offer free, no-obligation case evaluations. For more information, fill out our online contact form or call 1-800-YOURLAWYER (1-800-968-7529).

 



 

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Feds Propose Guidelines to Reduce Distracted Driving from Phones

Dec 13, 2016
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has proposed new guidelines in an effort to reduce distracted driving associated with mobile devices and other electronic devices. The voluntary guidelines ask manufacturers to implement pairing, in which the device is synchronized with the vehicle's infotainment system, and a Driver Mode, which creates a simpler interface. The goal is to remove potential distractions so the driver can remain focused on the road in front of them. is...

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Mar 30, 2015
A study by the American Automobile Association reveals that distracted driving by teenagers is even riskier than previously thought, especially when the young driver is multitasking with a cellphone. The research, published last week, is based on video evidence from cars driven by 16 to 19 years olds, The New York Times reports. Video cameras in the young drivers' cars gave researchers a view of the drivers' actions before nearly 1,700 crashes. The videos showed that time after time the young...

Ban Texting, Talking on Cell Phones While Driving, NTSB Tells States

Dec 14, 2011 | Parker Waichman LLP
Citing the terrible danger posed by distracted driving, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) voted unanimously yesterday to recommend that states institute near-total bans on the use of cell phones - including those employing hands-held technologies - while driving.  The proposal goes further than any current state law that regulates texting or other cell phone use while driving. "No call, no text, no update, is worth a human life," NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman said in a...

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