Request Call Back

Contact Us

Heart Valve Disease
*    Denotes required field.

   * First Name 

   * Last Name 

   * Email 

Phone 

Cell Phone 

Street Address 

Zip Code 

City 

State 

If you believe heart valve disease was due to a drug, please list drug:

   * Please describe your case:

For verification purposes, please answer the below question:
+
=

No Yes, I agree to the Parker Waichman LLP disclaimers. Click here to review.

Yes, I would like to receive the Parker Waichman LLP monthly newsletter, InjuryAlert.

please do not fill out the field below.

Heart Valve Disease

Heart Valve Disease Injury Lawsuits

Heart Valve Disease | Lawsuits, Lawyers | Injury, Death | Side Effects, Prescription Drugs

Heart valve disease occurs when the valve cannot open all the way because of disease or injury, so blood has a hard time flowing to the next heart chamber. Or the value does not close completely, and blood leaks backwards. As a result, the heart has to work harder to pump blood or blood may back up in the lungs or lower body.

The cause of valve disease can be a childhood attack of rheumatic fever, a bacterial infection or an injury to the heart. Some people are born with a valve that does not work properly, or the valves may wear out with the aging process. A variety of other problems, including coronary artery disease (blockages in the coronary arteries of the heart), can sometimes cause valve problems.

The heart has two halves, a left and a right, each with two chambers, the atrium and the ventricle. Between the chambers are the heart valves, which ensure that the blood runs only in one direction. There are also heart valves situated between the ventricles and the major arteries the aorta and pulmonary artery - where they have the same function. Failure in a valve in the left side of the heart the aortic or the mitral valve results in left-sided heart failure. This leads to an accumulation of fluids in the lungs, or pulmonary oedema.

Valve diseases of the right side of the heart, the pulmonary and tricuspid valve, is rare but can occur as the result of some forms of congenital heart disease or long-term left-sided heart failure. Right-sided heart failure is characterized by fluid accumulation in the body, particularly in the legs, abdominal cavity and the liver. Malformation of the heart valves can be divided into two categories: narrowed (stenosed) valves and leaking (regurgitant) valves or a combination of both.

Causes of Heart Disease:

  • congenital abnormality
  • degeneration through atherosclerosis (aortic stenosis only)
  • damage from rheumatic fever
  • excessive calcification in old age (aortic stenosis only)
  • bacterial infection or inflammation of a valve
  • excessive floppiness of the leaflets (mitral valve prolapse)
  • enlargement of the heart or aorta, the main blood vessel into which the left ventricle pumps

Legal Help For Victims Affected By Heart Valve Disease

If you or a loved one has taken prescription medications and been diagnosed with Heart valve disease, please fill out the form at the right for a free case evaluation by a qualified defective drug attorney or call us at 1-800-YOURLAWYER (1-800-968-7529).



 

Heart Valve DiseaseRSS Feed

Parkinson's meds, valve risk linked

Jan 9, 2007 | AP
The risk of heart valve damage with two drugs for Parkinson’s disease may be far greater than was known, new research suggests. The drugs are not the main treatment for Parkinson’s, but one is also sometimes used to treat restless legs syndrome. A study by Italian researchers found that roughly one-fourth of Parkinson’s patients taking pergolide or cabergoline, sold as Permax, Dostinex and other brands, had moderate to severe heart valve problems. Another study, by German...

Parkinson's Drugs May Have More Risks

Jan 8, 2007 | AP
The risk of heart valve damage with two drugs for Parkinson's disease may be far greater than was known, new research suggests. The drugs are not the main treatment for Parkinson's, but one is also sometimes used to treat restless legs syndrome. A study by Italian researchers found that roughly one-fourth of Parkinson's patients taking pergolide or cabergoline, sold as Permax, Dostinex and other brands, had moderate to severe heart valve problems. Another study, by German doctors, found that...

Parkinson’s Drugs May Lead to Heart Damage

Jan 4, 2007 | Newsinferno.com
Two new studies published in today’s New England Journal of Medicine have called into question the safety of two specific medications prescribed for Parkinson’s disease. The two drugs cited Valeant Pharmaceuticals’ Permax (pergolide) and Pfizer’s Dostinex (cabergoline) have been shown to lead to an increased risk of heart valve damage in Parkinson’s patients, but the new studies indicate that the risk of valve damage may be higher than previously thought. In the...

Two Parkinson's drugs linked to valve risk

Jan 4, 2007 | UPI
Two drugs used for Parkinson's disease increase the risk of heart-valve damage, studies said, prompting a U.S. official to call for a halt in their use. Patients who took pergolide or cabergoline are four to seven times as likely to suffer heart-valve damage as patients who did not, two studies in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine found. Previous reports of heart-valve disease links led to the drugs being prescribed less frequently, the Wall Street Journal said. Manufacturers said the...

Parkinson's drugs may have more risks

Jan 3, 2007 | AP
The risk of heart valve damage with two drugs for Parkinson's disease may be far greater than was known, new research suggests. The drugs are not the main treatment for Parkinson's, but one is also sometimes used to treat restless legs syndrome. A study by Italian researchers found that roughly one-fourth of Parkinson's patients taking pergolide or cabergoline, sold as Permax, Dostinex and other brands, had moderate to severe heart valve problems. Another study, by German doctors, found that...

More Heart Valve Disease News

Parker Waichman Accolades And Reviews Best Lawyers Find Us On Avvo