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Pella Windows are Flawed, Class Action Lawsuit Alleges

Aug 14, 2014

When windows are installed in the home, consumers expect them to last for a number of years. This is especially true when the windows have been marketed as a high-quality product that promises to be problem-free for a long period of time. A number of customers who purchased windows manufactured by Pella Corp. have reported that their windows failed prematurely and led to costly repairs. A class action lawsuit has been filed on their behalf, according to Law360.

The customers allege that the Pro-Line aluminum-clad windows have a faulty design that allows water to become trapped behind the aluminum cladding. This can cause premature wood rot and other types of damage, forcing homeowners to do costly repairs. More than 6 million Pella windows were sold between 1992 and 2010.

Pella has been getting backlash over its allegedly defective windows. The company has also been criticized by customers who say that the company refused to honor their warranty. According to a report by the Star Tribune earlier this year, this happened to customer Mary Kaden. About four years prior, she noticed some damage that she thought was regular wear-and-tear. When she opened one of the windows and a chunk of rotted sash fell out, however, she realized the severity of the situation. Kaden told Star Tribune that she "got a lot of push back," when she contacted the company and asked for a free replacement of the worse window. Pella would not honor the 10-year warranty for her 13-year old windows. Kaden says she was made to feel at fault when speaking with a customer service representative. "I felt like the worse homeowner. Like I did something wrong," she told Star Tribune.

Last April, U.S. District Judge James B. Zagel approved a $90 million settlement to resolve the Pella litigation, Law360 reports. The Seventh Circuit Court dismantled the settlement in June, however. The court also decided to replace the current class counsel. Parker Waichman LLP, a national law firm with decades of experience in product liability litigation, has been suggested for the role.

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